Google says it will no longer promote its anti-Muslim videos as it no longer supports “fake news”

The Washington Times article Google will no more promote its controversial anti-Islamic videos as Google no longer wants to promote them as “fake” news, the company said on Thursday.

The announcement comes amid a broader push by Google to improve its anti, anti-hate, anti­Muslim and anti­Black content and in a push to ensure that its search results include all viewpoints.

The company has been under fire from right-wing activists who say the videos have been edited to create a “hostile” or “biased” environment for Muslims and Muslims-led organizations.

Google declined to comment.

The changes are part of Google’s broader efforts to overhaul how it presents news, as it moves toward becoming more neutral and more open about what it sees as its core mission.

Google will also no longer allow the use of Google search results as “a source of news,” the company told the Associated Press in a statement.

Google’s new policy comes after several years of efforts to limit what people can see and share on the platform, including a recent policy that restricted the use and sharing of Google News posts, a decision that angered some conservatives.

Google, which had been among the biggest users of news and commentary on the Web, also made its search engine more transparent by removing “top” links from Google search in 2014.

The policy change comes after a month-long review of Google searches in the United States.

Google has been accused of being politically motivated and of pushing an agenda that seeks to suppress criticism of Islam.

Google announced its policy change in a blog post on Thursday, saying it is “a necessary step to make sure that the search results we present are the most accurate and up-to-date.”

Google has long faced criticism for what it says is biased content on its search engines.

Google was founded by Larry Page, a former chief executive of Apple Inc., and Eric Schmidt, a top executive at Alphabet Inc. Google searches have been under intense scrutiny by President Donald Trump and other critics, particularly over the content of its search index.

Trump has accused Google of unfairly suppressing information about him, and some critics have called on the search giant to take steps to stop the spread of false news.

In an effort to combat misinformation, Google has introduced “fake-news alerts” on its homepage, and it has begun to provide more tools to help users identify posts that have been modified or manipulated.

Google said it would no longer include “hate speech” as part of its anti­hate content guidelines, but will continue to “provide links to trusted sources” on the topic.

Google also said it will now be more transparent about what is posted in search results.

“We’ll continue to provide the public with the most up-tagged and accurate search results,” the statement said.

“In addition, we’ll continue creating a search result filter that makes it easier for people to identify, flag and report false information and hoaxes.”