Doctors face backlash after saying they would no longer recommend a blood thinner to their patients

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has issued a statement saying it is “unable to support the recommendation” of a blood thinning drug to prevent strokes.

The statement comes after a series of recent studies found that those taking the drug, called duloxetine, are more likely to have strokes than people not taking the medication.

The AAP says the results could be an indication of a drug’s potential benefit or risk.

The AAP also said there are no proven treatments for stroke or heart attacks and the study results may not be useful in preventing strokes.

According to the AAP, dulxetine has been approved for the treatment of certain conditions including asthma, diabetes, and some forms of cancer, but the drugs side effects include dizziness, dizziness or tingling in the hands, difficulty concentrating, confusion, headache, blurred vision, vomiting, nausea, muscle stiffness and difficulty swallowing.

Some studies have also found dulxietine to be ineffective at preventing heart attacks, and more studies need to be done.

The American Heart Association (AHA) and American Stroke Association (ASA) have both also issued statements urging parents to talk to their children about the benefits of blood thinners.

The AMA says the drugs benefits may outweigh the side effects.

The AHA said a study found that the drug was no more effective than placebo at preventing the occurrence of strokes in healthy people.

The ASPA says there is a need for more studies to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the drugs.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.