Canada to ban the importation of Chinese-made fireworks from the U.S.

Canada’s Competition Bureau says it plans to ban imports of fireworks made in China from the United States and other countries, citing a surge in counterfeit imports in recent years.

“We are banning the import of these fireworks,” Competition Commissioner Marguerite Moreau said Thursday in Toronto, after announcing a nationwide ban that will go into effect Nov. 1.

“This is an important decision that will not only benefit Canadians, but will also help prevent counterfeiters from stealing the goods.”

She did not say when or how Canada plans to implement the new rules.

Imports of Chinese fireworks are a significant source of revenue for Chinese companies.

They are often smuggled across the U., but Canadian customs has repeatedly flagged them as a major source of counterfeits.

The new rules are a response to a spike in counterfeit fireworks seized in the United State.

The Canadian government said last year that it had stopped the import into Canada of a large quantity of fireworks that were made in Canada, including some made in other countries.

Moreau says the new measure will help police identify the origin of counterfeit fireworks and stop the flow of counterfeit goods to Canadians.

She says the measure will also allow police to more effectively monitor and disrupt the illegal trade.

Canada has a long history of cracking down on counterfeiters.

In 2009, the federal government cracked down on a $1.5-million Chinese import that was made in a Canadian company.

A year later, the RCMP began to crack down on the sale of counterfeit guns.

In 2014, the country also cracked down heavily on the importations of counterfeit designer sunglasses.

In 2016, the government took steps to crackdowns on counterfeit Chinese and counterfeit American watches.

More than 20,000 counterfeit products were seized in Canada in 2017, and the RCMP said that in the first half of 2018 it had seized a record 4.6 million items.

Canada is not the only country to take action to crackdown on counterfeit goods.

In June, Britain launched a new anti-counterfeiting campaign that aims to stop the import from China of more than $400 million worth of counterfeit watches and sunglasses, a trend that has increased dramatically in recent months.

Last year, China made an estimated $30 billion in counterfeit goods and $13 billion in luxury goods, according to a report by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.